Tea in Fantasy

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Akhi Pillalamarri
Head Web Content Contributor
Twitter | Website

It’s always a pleasure to see things you enjoy appear in the literature you read. For example, in my previous post, I talked about how I liked seeing a terrain that appeals to me, the desert, in fantasy literature.

This same pleasure also extends to food and drink. I love tea. I love expanding my palate by trying out different varieties and preparing it in a multitude of ways. Just as there are numerous different grape cultivars that yield different types of wines, such is the case with the tea plant.

While the constructed worlds of some of the series I’ve read try to capture the diversity of wine and beer, I haven’t seen this effort extended as much to tea, and even less to coffee.

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Science Fiction and Space

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Akhi Pillalamarri
Head Web Content Contributor
Twitter | Website

 

Those of us who have read or watched science fiction know that one of the most common characteristics of sci-fi is travel through space. Star Wars, Star Trek, Dune, The Foundation Series, and the many of the most famous works of Arthur C. Clarke, Robert Heinlein, and other classic authors occur in space. Among modern sci-fi, award-winning books like Redshirts and Ancillary Justice also take place in this environment.

Space is, of course, beautiful, and has its charms, but I believe that the genre’s focus on space does not make much sense. Realistically speaking, it is unlikely we are ever going to be able to jump across stars in a single lifetime, and science fiction is about the future, or the possibilities of the future. Therefore, I believe that stories that take place in space, but lack realism — often, but not always, grouped together as “Space Opera” — are merely works of fantasy that take place in space. Even then, these works too ought to be subject to believable in-world explanations of why things are the way they are.

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